The Swedish gamble: trust in the government and self-efficacy in the battle to combat COVID-19.

Hassan MS, Al Halbusi H, Razali A, Ariffin RNR, Williams KA

Curr Psychol - (-) 1-16 [2022-03-19; online 2022-03-19]

Governments around the world have issued movement restrictions and quarantines to combat the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic. However, the Swedish government has not implemented such measures but has depended on individual responsibility. The extent to which individuals have been encouraged to trust in and be satisfied with government strategies and adopt personal health measures, such as social isolation, remains unclear. This study examines the direct effects of trust in the government and risk perception on self-efficacy. Most importantly, this study intends to explore whether satisfaction with government measures strengthens the relationships between 1) trust in the government and self-efficacy and 2) risk perception and self-efficacy. We test our suggested hypotheses using survey data obtained from 403 Swedish citizens living in Sweden. As predicted, the findings indicate that trust in the government and risk perception positively impact individual self-efficacy. Additionally, the findings reveal that satisfaction with government measures strengthens these relationships; more precisely, the impact of trust in the government and risk perception under a high level of individual satisfaction with government measures is much more positive than that under a low satisfaction level. In practice, a focus on implementing successful policies and excellent individual self-efficacy is required to halt the pandemic, and the findings indicate that combining strictly attentive and adaptive individual strategies with government strategies can minimize the spread of infection.

Category: Health

Category: Other

Type: Journal article

PubMed 35340688

DOI 10.1007/s12144-022-02947-w

Crossref 10.1007/s12144-022-02947-w

pii: 2947
pmc: PMC8933660


Publications 7.1.2