Consultations with health care providers and use of self-management strategies for prevention and treatment of COVID-19 related symptoms. A population based cross-sectional study in Norway, Sweden and the Netherlands.

Kristoffersen AE, van der Werf ET, Stub T, Musial F, Wider B, Jong MC, Wode K, Danell JB, Busch M, Hoenders HJR, Nordberg JH

Complement Ther Med 64 (-) 102792 [2021-11-23; online 2021-11-23]

The present study was initiated to determine consultations with health care providers and use of self-management strategies for prevention or treatment of COVID-19 related symptoms in countries with a full lockdown (Norway), a partial lockdown (the Netherlands) and no lockdown (Sweden) during the first three months of the COVID-19 pandemic, and if such use correlates with worries of being infected by COVID-19 disease. Data were collected in collaboration with Ipsos A/S in April-June 2020. An adapted version of the International Questionnaire to measure use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (I-CAM-Q) was used with the categories "for prevention of COVID-19" and "to treat COVID-19-related symptoms" added. Data were collected among a representative sample in Norway, Sweden and the Netherlands using data assisted telephone interviews (Norway, n=990 and Sweden, n=500), and an online survey (the Netherlands, n=1004). Total response rate was 30%. Very few consulted a health care provider with the intention to treat or prevent COVID-19 (1.2% and 1.0% respectively) with medical doctors mostly visited (1.0% and 0.9% respectively). Similarly, the use of self-management strategies to prevent or treat COVID-19 was low (3.4% and 0.2% respectively); most commonly used for prevention of COVID-19 were vitamins and minerals (2.8%). Consultations with health care providers and use of self-management strategies for prevention of COVID-19 were positively associated with worries of being infected with COVID-19. The COVID-19 pandemic does not seem to have evoked a large-scale difference in behavior related to consultations with health care providers or the use of self-management strategies in any of the three countries.

Category: Public Health

Type: Journal article

PubMed 34826590

DOI 10.1016/j.ctim.2021.102792

Crossref 10.1016/j.ctim.2021.102792

pii: S0965-2299(21)00133-3
pmc: PMC8609665


Publications 7.1.2